The Spanish Lady

As I went out through Dublin City at the hour of twelve at night,
Who should I see but the Spanish Lady
Washing her feet by candle light
First she washed them then she dried them
Over a fire of amber coals
In all my life I ne'er did see a maid so sweet about the sole

Chorus
Whack fol de turalura ladie
Whack fol de turalureley
Whack fol de turalura ladie
Whack fol de turalureley

As I came back through Dublin City at the time of half past eight
Who would I see but the Spanish Lady
Brushing her hair so trim and neat
First she teased it then she brushed it
On her lap was a silver comb
In all my life I ne'er did see so fair a maid since I did roam

As I went round old Dublin City when the sun began to set
Who would I meet but the Spanish Lady
Catching a moth in a golden net
When she spied me quick she fled me
Lifting her petticoats over her knee
In all my life I ne'er see a maid so gay as the Spanish Lady

I stopped to look but the watchman passed says he "young fella now the night is late
Along with you now or I will wrestle you
Straight way through the Bride-well Gate"
I blew a kiss to the Spanish Lady
Hot as a fire of angry coals
In all my life I ne'er did see a maid so sweet about the sole

As I went out through Dublin City as the hour of dawn was over
Who should I see but the Spanish Lady
I was lonely and footsore
First she coaxed me then she chid me
Then she laughed at my sad plight
In all my life I ne'er did see a maid so sweet as on that night

I've wandered north and I've wandered south through Stoneybatter and Patrick's Close
Up and around by the Gloucester Diamond
Round by Napper Tandy's house
Old age had laid her hand on me
Cold as fire of ashey coals
But where is the lovely Spanish Lady, neat and sweet about the soul.

Refrain

Another version:

Frank Harte sang several versions. The following is the version that he gave Tríona and Maighréad Ni Dhomhnaill.

SPANISH LADY.

As I was a walking through Dublin city about the hour of twelve of the night,
It was there I saw a Spanish Lady washing her feet by candlelight.
First she washed them and then she dried them, over a fire of ambry coals,
And in all my life I never did see such a maid about the soles.

Chorus:
She had 20, 18, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, none,
She had 19,17, 15, 13, 11, 9, 7, 5, 3 and one.

I stopped to look but the watchman passed. Said he, “Young fellow, now the night is late.
Along with you home or I will wrestle you straightway through the Bridewell gate.”
I got a look from the Spanish Lady, hot as a fire of ambry coals,
And in all my life I never did see such a maid so neat about the soles.

Chorus:
As I walked back through Dublin City as the dawn of day was o'er,
Who should I see but the Spanish lady when I was weary and footsore.
She had a heart so full of loving and her love she longed to share.
In all my life I never did meet with a maid that had so much to spare.

Chorus:
I have wandered north and I've wandered south by Stoneybatter and Patrick's Close,
And up and around by the Gloucester Diamond back by Napper Tandy's house.
But old age has laid her hand upon me cold as a fire of ashy coals,
And gone is the lovely Spanish Lady neat and sweet about the soles.

Chorus:
Round and around goes the wheel of fortune. Where it rests now wearies me.
Oh, fair young maids are so deceiving, sad experience teaches me.

Chorus:

Another version:

As I went down to Dublin city at the hour of twelve at night,
Who should I see but a Spanish lady washing her feet by candle light.
First she washed them, then she dried them, over a fire of amber coal.
In all my life I ne'er did see a maid so sweet about the soul,

Whack fol the too-ra loo- ra laddy, Whack fol the too-ra loo- ra- lay.

As I came back through Dublin city at the hour of half past eight,
Who should I see but the Spanish lady brushing her hair in the broad daylight.
First she tossed it then she brushed it, on her lap was a silver comb.
In all my life I ne'er did see a maid so fair since I did roam.

Now she's no mot for a puddle swaddy with her ivory comb and her mantle so fine
But she'd make a wife for the Provost Marshall drunk on brandy and claret wine
I got a look from the Spanish lady hot as a fire of ambry coals
In all my life I never did meet a maid so sweet about the soul

I've wandered north and I've wandered south through Stonybutter and Patrick's Close,
Up and around the Gloucester Diamond and back by Napper Tandy's house.
Old age has laid her hand upon me cold as a fire of ashy coal.
In all my life I ne'er did see a maid so sweet as the Spanish lady.

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Dublin Songs.